Welcome to the Palisades Interstate Park in New Jersey

Park Maps

Open / Closed in the Park:

PIPPD Twitter feed

See the Parkway Police Twitter feed for updates.

Allison Park: Open daylight hours.
Alpine Boat Basin: Gas dock open Weds. & Thu. 9 AM – 4:30 PM, Fri. to Sun. 9 AM – 5:30 PM. Closed Mon. & Tues. Gas dock is inaccessible at low spring tides (around new & full moons). 201-321-9055.
Alpine Picnic Area: Open daylight hours. Kearney House open most weekend and holiday afternoons.
Englewood Boat Basin: Please contact J.M. Englewood Marina: 201-568-1328.
Englewood Picnic Area: Open daylight hours. Snack Shack open Tues. to Thu. 10 AM – 5 PM, Fri. to Sun. 10 AM – 7 PM.
Fort Lee Historic Park: Grounds open daylight hours. Metered parking (year-round, click here for rates). Visitor Center open Weds. to Sun., 10 AM – 4:45 PM. 201-461-1776.
Greenbrook Sanctuary: Open daylight hours, membership required. 201-784-0484.
Hazard’s Ramp: Open daylight hours.
Henry Hudson Drive: Open daylight hours
Palisades Interstate Parkway in New Jersey: Open 24 hrs.
Park Headquarters: Administrative offices open Mon. to Fri., 8:30 AM – 4:30 PM except New Jersey State holidays. 201-768-1360. Parkway Police desk staffed at all times: 201-768-6001. Click here for Court information.
Ross Dock Picnic Area: Open daylight hours.
State Line Lookout: Grounds open daylight hours. Lookout Inn open 9:30 AM – 5 PM. 201-750-0465.
Trails: Open daylight hours.
Undercliff Picnic Area: Open daylight hours.

Sidebar last updated: October 8, 2016.
The information posted here is subject to change without notice.

Check our Calendar page for more.

On the western shore of the Hudson River in northeastern New Jersey, we are part of more than 100,000 acres of parklands and historic sites in New York and New Jersey managed by the Palisades Interstate Park Commission. The two states formed the Commission in 1900 to stop the defacement of the Palisades by stone quarries, which were blasting the famous cliffs for crushed stone.

Our album page has galleries of the Palisades as a National Natural Landmark, as a National Historic Landmark — and as seen by our visitors.

The Palisades Interstate Park in New Jersey is about 12 miles long, a half-mile wide, and encompasses 2,500 acres of wild Hudson River shorefront, uplands, and cliffs.

Visitors find within this park more than 30 miles of hiking and ski trails, a boat launching ramp, a scenic riverside drive, a cliff-top parkway and overlooks, riverfront picnic areas and playgrounds, a nature sanctuary, two boat basins, historic sites — and mile after mile of rugged woodlands and vistas just minutes from midtown Manhattan.

The Palisades Interstate Park is a National Historic Landmark and the Palisades are a National Natural Landmark.

The Long Path and Shore Trail are National Recreation Trails.

Thanks to the efforts of far-thinking people over a century ago and since, the New Jersey Palisades today belong to all of us. These pages were created to help you and others enjoy this great National Landmark.

This page last updated: October 8, 2016

Click to download our park brochure (for a smaller file, you can also download the brochure without color). Click here to download other park maps.

Recently in the park...

Above, warm fall days helped paint some pretty scenes along the Hudson. Below, Bill Streeter of the Delaware Valley Raptor Center shared some of his amazing rescue birds — including Mortimer, a fully grown saw-whet owl — at the annual “Hawks Over the Hudson” program at State Line Lookout.

Learning from the park...

Sometimes it’s the little stuff that adds up. From one typical weekend this summer at Ross Dock Picnic Area in Fort Lee, five of our Operations staff members collected 116 bread bag clips, 40 bread bag ties, 66 flattened beer bottle caps, and 52 soda can tabs.

Other things that were collected that weekend included Snapple caps, plastic bottle caps, plastic cap ring seals, 688 plastic water bottle caps, your standard plastic bags, napkins, paper plates and plastic cups, plastic dinner ware, balloons, etc, … and 649 beer bottle caps (even though alcohol is prohibited in the park).

Park staff and volunteers spend hundreds of hours a year collecting litter. If litter were not an issue, those hours could be used for other beautification and maintenance projects. Click here for more “Learning from the Park.”

Did you know…?

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